mexican independence day how is celebrated

How Mexican Independence Day is Celebrated in Mexico?

If you’re in Mexico on September 16, you’re in for a treat. That’s because it’s Mexican Independence Day, a national holiday that celebrates the country’s independence from Spain. While the day is celebrated throughout Mexico, the biggest celebrations take place in Mexico City, where the president rings a bell at the National Palace to commemorate the occasion.

Mexican Independence Day is a time for Mexicans to come together to celebrate their country’s history and culture. Festivities typically begin on the night of September 15, when people gather in town squares and plazas to hear the grito, or cry of independence, which is a reenactment of the call to arms made by Father Miguel Hidalgo in 1810. After the grito, people sing the national anthem, wave flags, and enjoy fireworks displays.

Throughout Mexico, people celebrate Mexican Independence Day in their own unique ways. Some communities hold parades, while others organize street parties or concerts. Traditional foods like chiles en nogada, tamales, and pozole are served, and people often dress in traditional clothing. Whether you’re in a big city or a small town, you’re sure to find plenty of ways to celebrate Mexican Independence Day.

Historical Background

Mexico’s Independence Day is celebrated on September 16th every year. It commemorates the beginning of Mexico’s War for Independence from Spain, which lasted for over a decade. This section will provide a brief overview of the historical background of Mexico’s Independence Day, including the role of Miguel Hidalgo, the revolution and Mexico’s fight for independence, and the Treaty of Cordoba and the end of Spanish rule.

mexican independence day

Role of Miguel Hidalgo

Miguel Hidalgo, a Catholic priest, is considered the father of Mexican independence. On September 16, 1810, he delivered a speech known as “El Grito de Dolores” in the town of Dolores, calling for Mexicans to rise up against Spanish colonial rule. Hidalgo’s speech became a rallying cry for the Mexican people and marked the beginning of the Mexican War of Independence.

Revolution and Mexico’s Fight for Independence

Following Hidalgo’s call to arms, a revolt against Spanish rule spread throughout Mexico. Hidalgo was joined by other revolutionary leaders, including José María Morelos and Ignacio Allende. The Mexican people fought fiercely against Spanish forces, and the war for independence continued for over a decade.

Treaty of Cordoba and the End of Spanish Rule

In 1821, Spanish rule in Mexico finally came to an end with the signing of the Treaty of Cordoba. The treaty, which was signed by Agustín de Iturbide and Spanish representatives, recognized Mexico’s independence and established the country as a constitutional monarchy. Iturbide became the first emperor of Mexico, and the country was renamed the Mexican Empire.

Overall, Mexico’s Independence Day is a celebration of the country’s liberation from colonial rule and the beginning of its journey towards independence. Today, the holiday is celebrated throughout Mexico with parades, festivals, feasts, parties, and more.

Significance of September 16th

mexican independence day miguel hidalgo

Mexican Independence Day is celebrated on September 16th every year. It is a national holiday that commemorates the day when Father Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla, a Catholic priest, delivered his famous speech known as “El Grito de Dolores” in 1810. In this speech, he called for the Mexican people to rise up against Spanish colonial rule and fight for their independence.

El Grito de Dolores

“El Grito de Dolores” is a famous cry for freedom that has become a symbol of Mexican independence. The cry was delivered by Father Hidalgo in the town of Dolores, Guanajuato, on the night of September 15, 1810. It is said that the cry was heard by thousands of people and it sparked the beginning of the Mexican War of Independence.

Comparison with Cinco de Mayo

Mexican Independence Day is often confused with Cinco de Mayo, which is celebrated on May 5th. However, the two holidays have different origins and meanings. Cinco de Mayo commemorates the Battle of Puebla, which was fought on May 5, 1862, between the Mexican army and French troops. Mexican Independence Day, on the other hand, celebrates the country’s independence from Spanish colonial rule.

In Mexico, the celebration of Mexican Independence Day begins on the night of September 15th, with the president of Mexico ringing the bell of the National Palace and delivering “El Grito de Dolores” to the crowd gathered in the Zócalo, the main square of Mexico City. The president shouts “¡Viva México!” and the crowd responds with “¡Viva!” This is followed by fireworks, music, dancing, and other festivities throughout the night.

Throughout Mexico, people celebrate Mexican Independence Day with parades, festivals, feasts, parties, and more. Mexican flags are everywhere, and the colors of the Mexican flag – green, white, and red – can be seen on decorations, clothing, and food. Traditional Mexican dishes such as pozole, chiles en nogada, and tamales are often served during the celebrations.

Overall, Mexican Independence Day is a significant holiday that celebrates the country’s fight for independence and its rich cultural heritage.

Celebration and Traditions

Mexican Independence Day is celebrated with great enthusiasm and joy throughout Mexico. The festivities begin on the night of September 15th, where Mexicans gather in town squares to celebrate “El Grito,” the cry for independence delivered by Miguel Hidalgo in 1810. The celebration is followed by fireworks, parades, and festivals that last for two days.

celebrations of mexican independence day

Fireworks, Parades and Festivals

Fireworks are an integral part of the Mexican Independence Day celebration. They light up the sky and add to the festive atmosphere. Parades are also a common sight during the celebration, with people dressed in traditional Mexican attire, waving the Mexican flag, and carrying banners that depict Mexican heritage and culture. In Mexico City, a grand military parade is held that showcases the country’s unity and strength.

Food and Beverages

Mexican cuisine is an important part of the celebration. Traditional dishes like chiles en nogada, pozole, menudo, queso fundido, and tacos are served in abundance. Beverages like tequila, margaritas, and other Mexican cocktails are also popular. The celebration is incomplete without the traditional dish of mole poblano, a rich and flavorful sauce made with chocolate and chilies.

Music and Dance

Mariachi music and folk dancing are an integral part of the Mexican Independence Day celebration. Street parties and fiestas are held, where people dance to the tunes of mariachi bands and traditional folk music. The sound of whistles and horns can be heard throughout the night as people celebrate their freedom and culture.

In conclusion, Mexican Independence Day is a time to celebrate Mexican heritage and culture. The celebration is marked by fireworks, parades, and festivals, traditional food and beverages, and music and dance. The celebration brings together Mexicans from all walks of life to celebrate their freedom and unity.

Mexican Independence Day in the United States

Mexican Independence Day is not just celebrated in Mexico, but also in the United States, where there is a large population of Mexican Americans. The holiday is recognized as a federal holiday in the U.S. and is celebrated in various cities across the country.

Celebrations in Los Angeles and Other Cities

Los Angeles is known for its vibrant Mexican American community, and the city celebrates Mexican Independence Day with a parade, music, and food. The parade usually takes place in East Los Angeles and features floats, dancers, and mariachi bands. Other cities in the U.S. also celebrate the holiday, including Chicago, Houston, and San Diego.

Many Mexican restaurants in the U.S. offer special menus and discounts on Mexican Independence Day. Americans of all backgrounds often participate in the festivities, enjoying the music, food, and culture of Mexico.

Chicano Civil Rights Movement

Mexican Independence Day also has a special significance for the Chicano civil rights movement. Chicano activists saw the holiday as an opportunity to celebrate their Mexican heritage and assert their cultural identity in the face of discrimination and oppression.

The Chicano movement emerged in the 1960s and 70s, a time of great social and political upheaval in the U.S. The movement sought to address issues of poverty, discrimination, and lack of representation faced by Mexican Americans.

Mexican Independence Day became an important symbol for the Chicano movement, representing the struggle for independence and freedom from oppression. Today, the holiday continues to be celebrated by Mexican Americans as a way to honor their heritage and assert their cultural identity.

Overall, Mexican Independence Day is an important holiday for Mexicans and Mexican Americans, celebrated both in Mexico and the United States. The holiday has a rich history and cultural significance, representing the struggle for independence and freedom.

Role of Key Figures

President of Mexico

The President of Mexico plays a crucial role in the celebration of Mexican Independence Day. On September 15th, the President of Mexico delivers the “Grito de Dolores” (Cry of Dolores) from the balcony of the National Palace in Mexico City. The “Grito de Dolores” is a reenactment of the call to arms made by Catholic Priest Miguel Hidalgo in 1810, which marked the beginning of the Mexican War of Independence.

mexican independence day president

After the “Grito de Dolores,” the President rings the bell of the National Palace and waves the Mexican flag, while the crowd responds with cheers and fireworks light up the night sky. The President’s speech is followed by the singing of the national anthem.

Catholic Priest and Other Heroes

Catholic Priest Miguel Hidalgo is considered one of the heroes of the Mexican War of Independence. On September 16, 1810, he rang the bell of his church in the small town of Dolores and called on the people of Mexico to rise up against the Spanish colonial government. Hidalgo’s call to arms, known as the “Grito de Dolores,” sparked the Mexican War of Independence.

Other heroes of the Mexican War of Independence include José María Morelos, who led the southern campaign, and Vicente Guerrero, who fought in the south and later became Mexico’s second president. These heroes are remembered and celebrated on Mexican Independence Day.

In addition to the heroes of the Mexican War of Independence, the people of Mexico also celebrate the freedom that the war brought to their country. Mexican Independence Day is a time to reflect on the country’s history and to celebrate the achievements of its people.

What events can I attend if I’m visiting Mexico during this holiday?

If you’re visiting Mexico during Independence Day, you’re in for a treat. The celebrations start on the night of September 15th, when the President of Mexico rings the bell of the National Palace in Mexico City and shouts “Viva Mexico!” three times. This marks the beginning of the celebrations, which continue throughout the day on September 16th.

mexican independence day celebrations

Here are some events you can attend during Independence Day:

Grito Ceremony

The Grito Ceremony is the most important event of the holiday. It takes place on the night of September 15th, and it’s a reenactment of the call for independence made by Father Miguel Hidalgo in 1810. The ceremony takes place in the main square of every town and city in Mexico. During the ceremony, the mayor or governor of the city shouts “Viva Mexico!” and the crowd responds with “Viva!” This is followed by the singing of the national anthem and a fireworks display.

Military Parade

On September 16th, there is a military parade in Mexico City. The parade starts at the Zocalo and ends at the Monumento a la Independencia. The parade features soldiers, tanks, and other military equipment. The President of Mexico also attends the parade and gives a speech.

Folkloric Dances

Throughout Mexico, there are folkloric dances that take place during Independence Day. These dances are a celebration of Mexico’s rich cultural heritage. The dances feature colorful costumes and traditional music. Some of the most popular dances include the Jarabe Tapatio and the Danza de los Viejitos.

Food and Drink

No celebration in Mexico is complete without food and drink. During Independence Day, you can find traditional Mexican dishes like pozole, tamales, and chiles en nogada. You can also enjoy traditional Mexican drinks like tequila and mezcal.

In conclusion, there are many events you can attend during Independence Day in Mexico. From the Grito Ceremony to the military parade, there is something for everyone. So, if you’re planning a trip to Mexico in September, make sure to join in the celebrations and experience the rich culture and history of this amazing country.

Conclusion

Mexican Independence Day is a significant holiday in Mexico, celebrated annually on September 16th. The holiday commemorates the country’s independence from Spain, which was declared in 1810 by Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla, a Catholic priest who led a revolt against the Spanish colonial government.

In Mexico, Independence Day is celebrated with great enthusiasm and pride. The celebrations begin on the evening of September 15th with the “El Grito” ceremony, in which the president of Mexico rings the bell of the National Palace in Mexico City and shouts “Viva Mexico!” to the cheering crowds. The ceremony is repeated in towns and cities all over Mexico.

The following day, September 16th, is a national holiday, and Mexicans celebrate with parades, festivals, feasts, parties, and more. The main plaza in Mexico City is packed with people waving Mexican flags, and the atmosphere is one of joy and excitement.

Throughout the country, people wear traditional Mexican clothing, such as the sombrero and the poncho. They also enjoy traditional Mexican food, such as tacos, enchiladas, and tamales, and drink tequila, mezcal, and beer.

Mexican Independence Day is a time for Mexicans to come together and celebrate their country’s rich history and culture. It is a day of national pride and unity, and it is a joyous occasion that is celebrated with great passion and enthusiasm.

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